Is the second new Covid-19 strain contagious? Here’s all we know so far about this variation.

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Is the second new Covid-19 strain contagious? Here’s all we know so far about this variation.

The South African strain, according to British health secretary Matt Hancock, is “even more transmissible and looks to have mutated further” than the UK form.

A second coronavirus variant has been discovered in the UK, after the discovery of a new coronavirus variant in the country. South Africa was the first place where the second, potentially more infectious coronavirus variant was discovered. So yet, none of the variations have been detected in the United States. On December 22, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned that “ongoing travel between the UK and the US, as well as the high prevalence of this variant among current UK infections, increase the likelihood of importation (of the UK variant).”

How many of the second variant’s instances have been discovered?

Two cases of the second novel coronavirus strain have been discovered in the United Kingdom. The cases in London and north-west England are contacts of people who have recently been to South Africa. According to British health secretary Matt Hancock, this strain is even more contagious than another that is presently circulating in England.

“In the United Kingdom, we’ve discovered two cases of a novel coronavirus strain. This new variation is quite alarming since it is even more transmissible and looks to have mutated more than the new strain detected in the United Kingdom “According to The Independent, Hancock stated during a briefing. “Anyone in the UK who has been in South Africa in the previous week, or anyone who has had in direct touch with someone who has been in South Africa in the last fortnight, must quarantine immediately,” he continued. On December 14, Hancock announced the discovery of a new coronavirus strain that may be linked to the quicker spread of the virus in the southeast of England. While the UK and South African varieties are distinct, they both have a mutation known as N501Y in a vital section of the virus that allows it to infect the body’s cells.

“They’re significantly different (the two types). They don’t share a common ancestor, although they do share a few characteristics. Both of them have a mutation in the spike glycoprotein that causes the spike protein to bind to cells and enter the body more effectively. In both South Africa and the United Kingdom, we believe that this lineage is far more transmissible than the previous one. And we’re working hard to learn as much as we can about it as soon as possible “Tulio de Oliveira, director of the University of KwaZulu-KwaZulu-Natal Natal’s Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), stated. Brinkwire News in a Nutshell

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