Instead of medicines, a doctor uses low-carb meals to treat diabetes.

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Instead of medicines, a doctor uses low-carb meals to treat diabetes.

A DOCTOR is assisting a large number of diabetics in overcoming their disease by suggesting a low-carb diet rather than medications.

Dr. David Unwin, 62, has helped over 100 people with Type 2 diabetes go into remission by following his advice. He acknowledged to dishing out drugs to suffering on a daily basis until a woman approached him in his surgery as an anti-sugar crusader and family GP. “I had not witnessed Type 2 drug-free remission on a single occasion until 2012,” he stated. I had no idea it was even possible.

“A patient came in, enraged because she had been put on unnecessarily long-term medication. She’d gone low-carb and quit taking her diabetes medication, demonstrating that she didn’t need them anymore.

“It was fantastic. I looked into it and got a lightbulb moment. I realized I had been neglecting my patients for years by accepting conventional wisdom that we must drug our way out of chronic illness without considering the underlying cause.”

The remarkable outcomes at Norwood Surgery in Southport, Merseyside, have transformed people’s lives while saving the NHS tens of thousands of pounds.

Each year, the clinic spends about £60,000 less on diabetic medications than the average for other surgeons in the area.

Dr. Unwin advises his patients to consume a lot of green vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, full fat milk, cream, and cheese, which do not raise blood sugar levels.

Starchy foods such as bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, crisps, cake, and chocolate are prohibited.

Dr. Unwin’s simple graphic depicting how common foods affect blood sugar levels has been downloaded millions of times throughout the world.

Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, official NHS guidelines still recommend meals centered on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta, or other starchy carbohydrates.

“I had a lot to learn,” Dr. Unwin remarked, “but the more I researched this disease and the strategies for beating it without medication, the more enlightened I became.” I used to stick to the rules and blame my patients if the treatments I offered them didn’t work.

“However, I can no longer look myself in the mirror if I casually prescribe medications, knowing that I am assisting individuals in their own recovery.”

The NHS now spends £15 billion a year on diabetes. “Brinkwire Summary News,” by Professor Jonathan Valabhji, national clinical director for diabetes for the NHS in England.

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