Concerns about an increase in Covid cases among young people, as the R rate in some parts of the UK is “as high as 1.6.”

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Concerns about an increase in Covid cases among young people, as the R rate in some parts of the UK is “as high as 1.6.”

Scientists warn that COVID instances in youngsters are “high and rising” as the winter season approaches, and that more teenagers need to be vaccinated.

According to the government’s REACT-1 mass-testing study, cases among under-18s increased in September while cases among adults decreased – and the virus’s R rate could be as high as 1.6 in some places.

Between September 9 and 27, 0.83 percent of persons tested positive in the regular poll, which included over 100,000 people across England.

Overall, the number of cases remained steady, although this was due to lowering adult rates offsetting a dramatic increase in children, according to the study.

The virus was found in 2.4 percent of under-18s, 0.46 percent of 18 to 24-year-olds, and 0.29 percent of people over 75.

Professor Paul Elliott of Imperial College London, who is leading the study, said, “Our latest data suggest that infections are high and rising among school-aged children.”

“Households with children had a greater prevalence of infection, implying that children may be passing the virus on to others with whom they live.”

“These trends emphasize the importance of vaccination for children aged 12 and up in order to assist prevent the spread of infection and minimize disruption to education.”

The R rate – the number of persons infected by each Covid case – was assessed to be 1.03 for the country as a whole, indicating that cases were either stable or rising slowly.

However, they speculated that the rate may be as high as 1.59 in London or 1.36 in the East Midlands.

The West Midlands, North East, South East, and Yorkshire and the Humber all had “signs of increase,” whereas the R in the West Midlands, North East, South East, and Yorkshire and the Humber was likely below one.

“Overall, we see this counterbalancing of the growth in children with the evident reduction in 18 to 54-year-olds,” said Professor Christl Donnelly. It’s a difficult push-pull situation.

“While the drop in adults is good, we’ve also observed signs of an increase in breakthrough infections as time goes on.”

Unvaccinated people had a threefold increase in cases, according to the study, while those who had been vaccinated had a higher risk the longer it had been since their vaccination.

Within three months after their second jab, just 0.35 percent of patients became infected, but after three months, the “breakthrough” infection rate jumped to 0.55 percent.

Unvaccinated people, on the other hand, had a rate of 1.76 percent, which was more than quadruple that of vaccinated people.

“These figures illustrate that while our vaccine effort continues to make a big effect, the pandemic is not ended,” said Dr Jenny Harries, chief of the UK Health Security Agency.

“As we approach winter, it’s more crucial than ever to… Brinkwire News in a Nutshell

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