Christine McGuinness, Paddy McGuinness’ wife, believes there may be a hereditary relationship to all three children’s autism.

0

Christine McGuinness, Paddy McGuinness’ wife, believes there may be a hereditary relationship to all three children’s autism.

PADDY MCGUINNESS’ wife Christine has stated that doctors believe there is a hereditary relationship between her three children having autism, which is a disorder in which a person’s brain functions differently than other people’s.

Christine McGuinness, 33, has spoken out after being left “intimidated” following a parking space dispute. A man challenged the TV personality, accusing her of illegally parking in a disabled place. Christine and her husband, Paddy McGuinness, have three autistic children: eight-year-old twins Penelope and Leo, and five-year-old Felicity.

Christine is slated to appear on ITV’s Tonight series, Hidden Disabilities: What’s the Truth, where she claims that other parents she knows “gave up” asking for blue badges since they are difficult to obtain and must be renewed every three years, according to Christine.

Christine, on the other hand, stated on This Morning that she’ll be in another documentary, this one looking into the genetic cause of autism.

“I feel there is a genetic link there,” she stated.

Everyone appears to believe there is a genetic link.”

According to Autism Speaks, there is no single cause of autism; rather, evidence suggests that autism is caused by a combination of genetic and nongenetic, or environmental, factors.

Symptoms of Vitamin B12 Deficiency: Three Physical Warning Signs

“These effects appear to raise the chance of a child developing autism,” it says.

“However, it’s crucial to remember that greater risk does not imply causation.

“For example, some autism-related gene alterations can be discovered in persons who do not have the illness.

“In the same way, not everyone who is exposed to an autistic risk factor will develop the illness. In fact, the vast majority will not.”

“Autism tends to run in families, according to research,” it continues. Changes in some genes enhance a child’s likelihood of developing autism.

“If one or more of these gene alterations are carried by a parent, they may be handed down to a child” (even if the parent does not have autism).

“In some cases, these genetic alterations occur spontaneously in an early embryo or in the sperm and/or egg that unite to form the embryo.

“Once again, the majority of these gene alterations aren’t enough to cause autism. They just raise the disorder’s risk.”

Christine went on to say how pleased she was of her children. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

Share.

Comments are closed.