According to a survey, Gen Z and millennials are the most inclined to adopt vegan or vegetarian in order to protect the environment.

0

According to a survey, Gen Z and millennials are the most inclined to adopt vegan or vegetarian in order to protect the environment.

According to studies, Gen Z and millennials are the most inclined to go vegan or vegetarian to help the environment, while baby boomers are the most likely to shop locally and avoid using plastic. The acts done by different generations to help the environment were explored in a study of 2,000 adults.

It was discovered that people aged 18 to 24 are nearly twice as likely as those over 60, the baby boomer generation, to have adopted “green” lifestyle modifications.

It’s encouraging to see that, regardless of our age, we’re all rallying to combat the climate issue.

OVO’s Head of Sponsorship and Partnerships, Colin Banks

The younger generation also won when it came to using reusable nappies and sanitary items, as well as buying shampoo and conditioner bars, which is good for the environment and good for their wallets.

However, when it comes to air drying clothes rather than tumble drying them, baby boomers are setting the standard, both for the environment and for the longevity of their apparel.

They also buy more loose fruit and vegetables to reduce their use of plastic, and they are more likely to compost their food waste, according to the report.

They are also more likely to cultivate their own fruit and vegetables, turn off lights and other devices when not in use, and cycle or walk instead of driving.

“It’s great to see that everyone is making an effort to go green, but there are some interesting differences in habits between age groups,” said Colin Banks, Head of Sponsorship & Partnerships at green power company OVO, which commissioned the research to mark the launch of its bike share scheme in Glasgow, Cardiff, and The Vale.

“While younger people are more inclined to make more dramatic lifestyle changes, such as changing their diet or shopping habits, older people are reverting to their childhood habits, such as air drying clothes and foregoing the automobile, and doing a series of modest things that add up to a significant difference.

“We can all make little adjustments to help make the world a better place. It’s wonderful to see that, regardless of our age, we’re all rallying to combat the climate crisis.”

According to the report, 86 percent of respondents believe themselves to be environmentally conscious in their daily lives and shopping.

“Brinkwire Summary News”), and more than half (52.

Share.

Comments are closed.