According to a new study, the flu vaccine protects against the severe symptoms of COVID-19.

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According to a new study, the flu vaccine protects against the severe symptoms of COVID-19.

According to current research, the flu vaccine may give critical protection against COVID-19. In individuals with the virus, the annual flu vaccination was found to minimize the incidence of stroke, sepsis, and DVT.

Every year, the flu vaccine is made available on the NHS to help prevent people who are susceptible to the winter sickness and its complications. It may also protect against COVID-19, according to new research presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID), which was hosted online this year.

COVID-19 patients who had received a flu vaccine were also less likely to be hospitalized and admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU).

Despite the fact that vaccine manufacturing and distribution are increasing every day, some countries are not anticipated to vaccinate major portions of their populations until the beginning of 2023.

Previous small studies have revealed that the flu vaccine may confer protection against COVID-19, implying that it could be a useful tool in the pandemic fight.

To learn more, Susan Taghioff and colleagues from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida, conducted a retrospective review of data on tens of thousands of patients from around the world.

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The study analyzed de-identified electronic health records kept on the TriNeX research database of more than 70 million patients to find two groups of 37,377 patients, making it the largest of its kind.

Age, gender, ethnicity, smoking, and health conditions such as diabetes, obesity, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were used to match the two groups for characteristics that could affect their risk of severe COVID-19.

Before being diagnosed with COVID-19, members of the first group had received the flu vaccine anywhere from two weeks to six months prior.

Those in the second group had COVID-19 as well, but were not flu-vaccinated.

Patients were recruited from the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Israel, and Singapore.

Patients were recruited from the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Israel, and Singapore.

The two groups were then compared in terms of the incidence of 15 adverse events within 120 days of testing positive for COVID-19.

Sepsis, strokes, DVT, pulmonary embolism, acute respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, arthralgia or joint pain, renal failure, anorexia, heart attack, pneumonia, and emergency were among the negative events. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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