Women are being left out of an assessment of underpaid state pensions by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) – Are you missing out on something?

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Women are being left out of an assessment of underpaid state pensions by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) – Are you missing out on something?

THOUSANDS OF WOMEN HAVE BEEN AFFECTED BY STATE PENSION ERRORS, resulting in many of them being underpaid when it comes to their UK state pension.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) was questioned about it today during a meeting of the Work and Pensions Committee. According to a research paper issued in May of last year by pension consultants Lane Clark and Peacock (LCP), tens of thousands of older women may be eligible to a greater rate of state pension than they were previously getting.

The DWP has since stated that it will conduct a review of its records, which will cover a subset of the women affected.

This means that the trawl will include married women whose spouse attained pension age after March 17, 2008, and whose pension should have been automatically boosted when he retired.

The government agreed to provide information on how many women were found and how much money was paid out.

The review will not, however, encompass all women who are suspected to be receiving less than they are entitled to.

Thérèse Coffey, the Secretary of State for the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), was questioned about the problem today when testifying before the Work and Pensions Committee.

Steve McCabe, the Labour MP for Selly Oak in Birmingham, questioned if there were any intentions to include divorced women or women whose husbands turned 65 before March 17, 2008.

“Because I know they were left out of the written statement – there was no mention of them.

“Obviously, if you’ve recently divorced, the last thing on your mind is to call the DWP and double-check your pension entitlement.

“And perhaps ladies whose husbands turned 65 before March 2008 didn’t think it was a priority, either – but they certainly missed out, just like a lot of other people.

“Do you have any intentions to include them at this time?”

“Of course, the law changed in 2008, which is why the treatment is different, and the obligation was on the Department post 2008, which is why the focus of the exercise is on that,” Peter Schofield, Permanent Secretary at the Department for Work and Pensions, responded.

“So that’s where we’re concentrating right now.

“However, if anyone believes they were impacted prior to 2008, we strongly encourage them to come in.”Brinkwire Summary News”.

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