University of St. Andrews hydrogen specialists aim to help transform the rail industry.

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In a project that could provide a boost to the Central Belt’s transport supply chain and tourism industry, a decommissioned ScotRail train was used to build environmentally friendly travel links.

The train is being converted to operate on hydrogen, which is intended to provide non-electrified rail routes with a safer, greener alternative to diesel.

Work on the railway, funded by Scottish Enterprise, is being carried out at the COP26 climate change conference in Glasgow next November by a business group with the goal of showcasing the train to a global audience.

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The goal of the project is to promote the creation of a technology for which global demand could emerge, generating opportunities for Scottish companies in the process.

Michael Matheson, Minister of Transport, said, “This project has the potential to transform the future of Scottish rail.”

Our Rail Decarbonisation Action Plan aims to make our passenger services zero-emission by 2035, but we we need to look at what we do with retired rolling stock in order to optimize our climate change goals. There are significant climate benefits to be achieved if we can get them back into service in a carbon-neutral way.

At the Bo’ness & Kinneil Railway site on the south side of the River Forth, the conversion work on ScotRail’s Class 314 electrical trains is being completed.

BP has completed a $5 billion agreement to sell the petrochemical company to the owner of the Grangemouth refinery.

The site has a vintage steam train and is run by the Scottish Railway Preservation Society (SRPS). In the face of closures enforced to contain the spread of the corona virus, the tourist attraction faced major difficulties.

We are pleased to be able to work on this project and the arrival of Class 314 units at our site at a time when we have had a very difficult year is a welcome and optimistic move towards our future,”We are delighted to be able to work on this project and the arrival of the Class 314 units at our site at a time when we have had a very difficult year is a welcome and positive step towards our future.”

The research is being carried out at the University of St Andrews in collaboration with Transport Scotland and the Hydrogen Accelerator.

Arcola Energy, which has developed zero-emission propulsion systems for use in the transport sector, is the consortium working on the project.

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