‘It was too late,’ says the narrator. A WASPI woman recalls learning that the state pension age for women had been raised.

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‘It was too late,’ says the narrator. A WASPI woman recalls learning that the state pension age for women had been raised.

PENSION FROM THE STATE Women’s state pension ages have climbed from 60 to 65 to keep up with men’s, and now both sexes’ ages are rising. It reached 66 last year, with more rises on the way.

Julia, whose name has been changed, is well aware of the situation. The retired teacher, who was born in the 1950s and recently turned 66, is one of millions of women who have been affected by the gradual increase and then acceleration of the state pension age for women.

Julia, who is a member of the Women Against State Pension Inequality (WASPI) campaign group, told This website that she started working at the age of 15.

“I had a Saturday job the minute I could obtain one at 15, when I was still in school,” she claimed.

Julia started university at the age of 17 and worked part-time during the holidays.

Before starting her profession as a teacher, she earned an honours degree and a post-graduate degree.

Julia worked for two years after her preliminary year of full-time teaching.

“Funnily enough, I was interviewed by the female mistress shortly after I had married. ‘Do you promise not to get pregnant if we offer you the position for two years?’ she inquired.

“To which we would now respond, ‘What, that’s none of your concern.’ But I made a vow.

“I put in two years of work. So there was roughly three years of full-time teaching.”

Julia had her first kid after which she took an 18-month maternity leave before returning to work part-time.

Julia, on the other hand, made sure she didn’t have any gaps in her National Insurance record during that time.

“Every week, I went out of my way to sign on, despite the fact that it was really inconvenient in the snow in January.

“Not to make money, but to maintain my National Insurance stamps current so I wouldn’t have any gaps.”

Julia made sure she completed it while she was on maternity leave with her second child.

She returned to work when the child was 18 months old.

“However, because my husband had a better-paying teaching career than I had, I ended up working part-time or doing a lot of supply teaching because there was no daycare available.”

Julia recalls working in a high-stress supply position. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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