As manufacturing returns home, precision engineer gets electrifying results.

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As manufacturing returns home, precision engineer gets electrifying results.

Demand for precision engineer HV Wooding’s cutting-edge work in renewable energy, electric vehicles, data centers, and battery component production is soaring.

The third-generation family business and its 90-strong workforce in Hythe, Kent, have achieved a £10 million turnover and 10% increase by supplying some of the hottest industrial industries amid a global green push. Wooding’s subcontracting services extend from design and development to assembly and product testing. It is a bespoke producer of parts, tooling, electroplating, and busbars (crucial metal strips carrying electric currents).

Customers include General Electric and Rolls Royce, as well as Cern’s Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator. Its components have also helped power Cern’s Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator.

The company’s resilience has been built on innovation and a commitment to keep improving, allowing it to weather downturns and consumers shifting to lower-cost economies.

The biggest, most positive impact has been investment in equipment, including £1.5 million in super-accurate laser cutting machines that have doubled capacity and a new Bruderer press that has enabled production to return to Wooding from overseas thanks to a new aerospace contract.

“Our sales are expected to increase by 20% as a result of these,” says CEO John Wooding.

“We aren’t a large-scale supplier. Our service focuses on providing high-quality, customized solutions, as well as a diverse range of manufacturing processes and input, as well as technical expertise to add value at each stage of the process. We can advise on the achievable and the impossible based on our experience.”

The company, which helped with the statewide ventilator shortage last year, has moved quickly to capitalize on new patterns arising in the aftermath of Brexit and the epidemic.

“Supply chain disruptions, quality difficulties, rising material costs, and freight charges have increased customer awareness of the benefits of localized trading,” he says. “We re-engaged with previous clients and are currently finishing orders that have been re-shored from Spain,” says the company.

Covid and the pandemic prompted a rethinking. “We looked at how we could be more efficient and leaner,” Wooding continues.

After establishing itself in the electric vehicle market with its battery and drivetrain busbars, the company is now bidding to be a part of the Faraday Battery Challenge, a new £318 million competition. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

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