SNP under criticism for ‘illusory pledges’ in the strategy for climate change

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The Scottish government has been accused of failing to determine how its climate crisis tackling policy will be applied – and has been criticized for relying on “get out of jail free card” technologies.

The revised climate change strategy, rewritten after MPs decided that goals to reduce carbon emissions by 66 percent of 1990 levels by 2030 should be boosted to 75 percent, has been released by Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham.

The plan, originally scheduled for release in April, sets out a range of initiatives including reducing car usage, phasing out petrol and diesel cars and vans, and aiming to make Scotland the “the world’s first zero-emissions aviation region” with a pledge to decarbonize scheduled flights by 2040.

The document contains a £ 180 million New Energy Technology Fund to support the growth over the next five years of Scotland’s hydrogen and carbon capture and storage industries, as well as the development of technologies for negative emissions.

However, environmentalists fear that these innovations would act as a shield for carbon pollution mitigation failures.

Scotland to become the ‘world’s first aviation area with zero emissions’

“Although there are welcome policy improvements, there are unfortunately very real doubts that this plan as a whole will actually fulfill these commitments, and some sectors have been held back from doing their fair share, Jess Cowell, climate campaigner for Friends of the Earth Scotland, said, “Although there are welcome policy improvements, there are unfortunately very real doubts that this plan as a whole will actually fulfill these commitments, and some sectors have been held back from doing their fair share.

The strategy relies heavily on illusory claims by the end of this decade of carbon capture, hydrogen from coal, and hare-brained attempts to burn oil for trees. There is a real risk that the government will use negative emission technology as a free pass to pad their statistics instead of doing the hard work of reducing pollution here and now.

If public funds is invested in a variety of clean energy and energy conservation programs instead of being spent on carbon capture, fossil hydrogen, and other industries dominated by the oil and gas industry, it would offer more jobs, quicker emissions reductions, and greater boosts to well-being.

“With UN climate negotiations taking place in Glasgow next year and the clock ticking on solving the climate crisis, Scotland needs a bold plan that sets out steps to phase out fossil fuel extraction and use, while ensuring a just transition for workers and communities dependent on the industry.”

“Shifting the phase-out of fossil fuels to 2030 will bring real benefits in terms of reducing harmful air pollution on our roads and reducing climate emissions,” Ms. Cowell said.

“The commitment to reduce road miles traveled is very welcome given transport’s role as our most polluting sector, but lacks detail and the specific actions that will lead to this change.”

Concerns were also raised about the prospect of the Green Employment plan and the effect on employees.

The Scottish government cites cold weather for missing emissions targets.

“We know from past experience that promises of green jobs are easily broken if they are not followed by political action, Dave Moxham, deputy general secretary of the Scottish Trade Union Congress, said, “While the proposal contains a range of references to industry association estimates on green jobs, there seems to be no fresh insight from the Scottish government on how this plan would affect wo

“While there is a reference to environmental standards, no concrete proposals seem to have been made to ensure that low-carbon and renewable energy firms in the Scottish supply chain actually generate high-quality jobs. There are still no plans to ensure that the public sector of Scotland benefits from the green industrial revolution and that multinational companies don’t just raise profits.

Fabrice Leveque, WWF Scotland Head of Strategy, Sa

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