Two-thirds of Britons want to live sustainably but are unable to do so because of rising living costs.

0

Due to rising living costs, two-thirds of Britons want to live sustainably but are unable to do so.

Nearly half of Britons were willing to spend more three months ago to live an environmentally friendly lifestyle, but now they are concerned about paying basic household bills.

New research shows that millions of Britons are unable to live sustainably due to rising national insurance contributions, the UK’s energy crisis, and annual food and beverage inflation.

According to a survey of 2,000 adults, 64% want to be environmentally conscious, but are concerned that rising living costs will make it impossible.

Six out of ten people are concerned about paying basic bills and buying groceries, and a quarter (26%) say more expensive organic or ethically sourced options will now be at the bottom of their shopping list.

This is in contrast to data gathered just three months ago, which suggested that Brits would be willing to pay a premium for goods that were environmentally friendly.

According to the Green Response report, which was created by the hygiene and health company Essity to examine how attitudes and behaviors toward the environment have changed since the outbreak began, 45 percent of adults were willing to spend more money to live an eco-friendly lifestyle previously.

Spending 12% more on hygiene and health products, 11% more on groceries, and 10% more on beauty and personal care was found to make people happy.

However, new data from Essity shows a significant shift in attitude, with 62 percent of respondents unsure they’ll be able to make ends meet, at a time when experts predict the average household will have to spend around £125 more per month in living costs.

If the bills rise as predicted, people will have to make two major sacrifices: expensive purchases (41%), and cutting corners on sustainable living (33%).

“In the space of three short months, there have been a number of announcements that have left the majority of people uneasy about being able to afford basic necessities such as petrol, electricity, food, drink, and so on,” said an spokesman for Essity, which has compiled a comprehensive white paper detailing the nation’s attitudes toward sustainability.

“It’s no surprise, then, that even when people want to do their best for the planet, they feel powerless.

“The good news is that 49 percent of those polled say they live a greener lifestyle now than they did before the pandemic, and 91 percent of those polled say they live a greener lifestyle now than they did before the pandemic.

The news is summarized by Brinkwire.

Share.

Comments are closed.