Tampon tax: Government abolishes VAT on hygiene products

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One of the primary activists of the movement, Laura Coryton, accuses Tory politicians of attempting to turn the problem into a “pro-Brexit cause”

After the government made good on its March pledge to remove VAT on feminine hygiene items, the tampon tax was abolished. But the activist who played a key role in the tax abolition movement, after politicians said the tax was abolished thanks to Brexit, accused the government of using the subject as a political football. Current EU legislation has prohibited Member States from cutting VAT below 5%. Laura Coryton, who started the Stop Taxing Periods movement as a student at Goldsmiths College in May 2014, said the Brexit process made it less likely that the tampon tax will be abolished across Europe: today is a celebration day, but it’s only disappointing that the tampon tax is used in relation to Brexit as a political football. “Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, said he was “proud” that the government had fulfilled its promise, adding that in schools, colleges and hospitals it was providing free sanitary products. Sir Bernard Jenkin, the Conservative chairman of the Commons Liaison Select Committee, said at the Brexit debate on Wednesday, “We would be able to do stuff like remove the tampon levy, which so many women have railed It’s fantastic that it’s really taken seriously by the government – if the prime minister can talk about the time, then certainly everyone can talk about it,”It’s great that the government is really taking it seriously – if the prime minister can talk about period, surely everyone can talk about period,” “But it’s frustrating … to make this campaign a pro-Brexit thing because it doesn’t reflect the many different kinds of people who have been campaigning for this. “‘Sex for sanitary napkins’: How Kenya’s Lockdown Led to a Teen Pregnancies RiseRead MoreAlso, it’s not true, she said, adding that the European Parliament voted unanan in 2016 – under pressure from then-Prime Minister David Cameron – “That process has gone cold since then because we then left the EU and we were the ones pushing for it,” Coryton said. If anything, the Brexit made it worse because if we had remained in the EU, this legislation would have gone through… so any EU member, not just the UK, would be able to abolish the tax. “If anything, the Brexit made it worse because if we had stayed in the EU, this legislation would have gone through…then any EU member would be able to abolish the tax, not just the UK. ” “The tampon tax has long been a symbol of male-focused policies, so abolishing it is symbolically important,”The tampon tax has long been a symbol of male-focused policies, so abolishing it is symbolically significant. “But the money from the tampon tax was an important source of funding for the women’s sector – the government needs to be clear about what it will replace.”

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