How to preserve honey bees: Proven methods for reviving overworked bees

0

How to preserve honey bees: Proven methods for reviving overworked bees

BEES ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE PROSPERITY OF YOUR GARDEN’S PLANT LIFE. HOW CAN YOU ASSIST THESE HARDWORKERS?

Bees begin to buzz in the spring and are most busy during the summer. Bees will be working tirelessly to pollinate the lovely flowers in your garden this summer. Sugar water has been promoted as a terrific way to aid exhausted bees, but does it work?

Because bees are so busy, they have a rapid metabolism, and even one with a full stomach of nectar can be just 40 minutes away from starving, according to Professor Dave Goulson of the University of Sussex.

If you see a bee crawling on the ground this summer, it’s most likely because it’s exhausted.

To aid them on their way, many Brits will place a bowl of sugar water on the table.

Is this, however, a helpful solution or will it have a negative impact on bee health?

In 2018, a bogus Facebook post purporting to be from Sir David Attenborough asked British citizens to leave sugar water out for bees that were exhausted.

“The bee population has decreased by 1/3 in the last five years,” the post stated. Humans would have only four years to live if bees vanished off the face of the Earth.

“At this time of year, bees may appear to be dying or dead, yet they are far from it. Bees can become exhausted and lack the energy to return to the hive, which can lead to them being carried away.”

The directions for putting out water mixed with sugar to help exhausted bees get back on their feet were subsequently included in the post.

Although this post was exposed as a hoax and has since been removed, it was unintentionally shared by millions, and many people still believe that sugar water can help suffering bees.

Many experts have panned the article, arguing that by omitting this option, well-wishers in the United Kingdom may be endangering bee health.

“Sugar solution should always be used as a last resort to help bees that look fatigued and exhausted because they are only able to deliver a rapid hit,” Buglife, one of the UK’s largest bug charities, told the BBC.

Instead of leaving sugar water out, Buglife suggests that Brits place exhausted bees on flowers. “Brinkwire News in Condensed Form.”

Share.

Leave A Reply