China has just made it illegal for any child to play video games for more than three hours.

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China has just made it illegal for any child to play video games for more than three hours.

CHINA is limiting the amount of time that millions of children can spend playing video games.

Beijing has announced new guidelines limiting the amount of time youngsters can spend playing video games. Children under the age of 18 in China were allowed to play video games for one and a half hours on most days under guidelines in place from 2019. However, this is currently being severely reduced, with only three hours of training per week.

China’s National Press and Publication Administration issued the new rules today (Monday, August 30).

Children under the age of 18 will be limited to one hour of video game play between the hours of 8 and 9 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, according to the rules.

On legal holidays in China, children will be able to play games at the same time.

The guidelines are described as a measure to protect the mental and physical wellbeing of youngsters.

According to CNBC, the revelation has come as a huge blow to Chinese gaming behemoths NetEase and Tencent.

The Chinese versions of the popular Blizzard titles World of Warcraft, Starcraft 2, and Overwatch are hosted by NetEase.

Tencent owns a portion of the popular free-to-play game Fortnite, and one of its companies produces Call of Duty Mobile, another big hit.

In 2019, Tencent teamed with Nintendo to bring the Mario maker’s wildly popular Nintendo Switch device to the region.

NetEase’s US-listed shares slumped 6.7 percent in morning trade as a result of the announcement on gaming rules.

In an interview with CNBC The new laws, according to Daniel Ahmad, a senior analyst at Niko Partners, will affect nearly 110 million youngsters in China.

“There are over 110 million minors who play video games in China today, and we expect the new regulations will reduce the number of players and the amount of time and money spent in games by those under the age of 18,” Ahmad said.

“However, given that time and spending constraints have already been in place for minors for the past two years, we do not expect the decrease in spend to have a substantial material impact on gaming firms’ bottom lines.

“Given a result, we anticipate a smaller impact on overall growth rates, as minors’ spending was already low.”

“Brinkwire Summary News” will enforce the rules.

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