‘Bright: Samurai Soul’ on Netflix: Awe-inspiring action outshines clumsy writing.

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‘Bright: Samurai Soul’ on Netflix: Awe-inspiring action outshines clumsy writing.

The way the film merges animation with Japanese woodblock print style is the most fascinating aspect of the film.

‘Bright: Samurai Soul’ spoilers’Netflix’s ‘Bright: Samurai Soul’ stuns with its details. It gives the impression that death is genuine. It doesn’t shy away from its attempt to make the plot more believable by slicing off limbs, heads, and splattering blood all over the screen in massive amounts. Jin Aketagawa’s music direction gives the characters greater depth. In English, the voice cast (we watched the anime spin-off) is still impressive. The plot, on the other hand, is a huge letdown.

The film ‘Bright,’ starring Will Smith, was a massive flop. It was the kind of part fantasy, part science fiction, and part comedic film that would leave no lasting impressions by the time the credits rolled, and when the Netflix series reveals that it’s based on the live-action film, there’s already a sense of doom. For what it’s worth, the other aspects that went into developing this spin-off aid in getting through the 80-minute movie.

‘Eden’ Review by Brinkwire News: The Seven Deadly Sins: Cursed by Light, Netflix’s first Japanese original anime, portrays an intriguing dystopian image. The Netflix movie’s release date and everything you need to know about it ‘Samurai Soul,’ directed by Kyhei Ishiguro and written by Michiko Yokote, is set in an alternate version of Japan’s Meiji Restoration era in which humans, orcs, goblins, fairies, and elves coexist. The story begins in the past, when two forces battle for control of a mystical wand with the power to either bring light into the world or suffocate it in darkness.

After a sacrifice, normalcy is restored, and the evil is vanquished. Years later, in the present, the light and dark teams up to hunt down elves in order to reclaim the mythical wand. In the midst of the deathly conflict, a Rnin samurai named Izou (Yki Nomura/Simu Liu), an orc named Raiden (Daisuke Hirakawa), and a teenage elf named Sonya (Shion Wakayama/Yuzu Harada) find themselves.

The way the film merges animation with Japanese woodblock print style is the most fascinating aspect of the film. The action is stunning, providing even another reason to watch the anime, but the clumsy writing and flimsy premise are a disappointment. Nomura does a fantastic job with Izou, turning him into one of those strong-yet-quiet fighters, while Wakayama as Sonya screeches to perfection in scenes that call for it. There aren’t many surprises, and the plot is simple. Overall, if you enjoyed ‘Bright,’ this is the one for you. We’ll give it a 2.5/5 for now.

Netflix has a streaming version of ‘Bright: Samurai Soul.’

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