According to math, which cat breed is the most beautiful?

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OUR furry friends will always look perfect to us but according to mathematics, there are certain breeds of cats deemed to be more “beautiful” than others.

We have all heard the theory behind models with symmetrical faces being the most attractive. And now a similar theory has been applied to felines using the “golden ratio”.

New research from All About Cats has utilised this golden ratio to analyse the facial proportions of 46 of the best-known cat breeds to mathematically deduce the most beautiful cats in the world.

We have broken down the statistics for you and the results are pretty interesting.

Ratio result = 1.65, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.03

Ratio result = 1.65, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.03

Ratio result = 1.59, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.03

Ratio result = 1.67, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.05

Ratio result = 1.67, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.05

Ratio result = 1.56, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.06

Ratio result = 1.69, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.07

Ratio result = 1.55, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.07

Ratio result = 1.71, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.09

Ratio result = 1.72, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.1

Ratio result = 1.72, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 0.1

Ratio result = 58.49, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 56.87

Ratio result = 19.78, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 18.16

Ratio result = 7.49, difference from Golden Ratio of 1.62 = 5.87

The Norwegian Forest, the Russian Blue and the Manx have secured a tie for the top spot, all scoring within 0.03 of the golden ratio of 1.62.

It seems that mathematical beauty does not come cheap with a Russian Blue costing between £700 and £1,200. Meanwhile a Norwegian Forest cat costs between £600 and £1,000 and a Manx £300 to £1,000.

At the other end of the spectrum, the Himalayan is the “ugliest” cat breed followed by the Peterbald and Persian cat. Despite their substantially lower ranking for visual appeal, the monetary value of such breeds hardly wanes.

The price range of a Himalayan cat is between £150 and £2,000, that of the relatively rare Peterbald is between £1,200 and £2,300 and the Persian could fetch between £950 and £2,200.

If. “Brinkwire Summary News”.

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