A guest on Antiques Roadshow was ‘terrified’ by the exorbitant value of a rare opal necklace.

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A guest on Antiques Roadshow was ‘terrified’ by the exorbitant value of a rare opal necklace.

When ANTIQUES ROADSHOW expert Susan Rumfitt disclosed the huge value of a family opal necklace, one guest was “terrified.”

A visitor was struck speechless after expert Susan Rumfitt announced her grandmother’s opal necklace was worth a “terrifying” amount on a recent edition of BBC’s Antiques Roadshow. The guest revealed that the opal stone had traveled from Australia to Scotland with them when they moved back home, but he wasn’t expecting to learn how valuable it was.

Susan began her visit to the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh by saying, “What a lovely opal you’ve brought along today.”

“And a lovely picture with a lovely bridal gown, how are the two connected?”

“Well, this image is of my grandfather and grandmother on my mother’s side; my grandfather was from Fife, and my grandmother was an international tennis star from Australia,” the guest added.

“But they actually got married not far from here in Edinburgh, and I believe my grandfather bought her this because it’s from Edinburgh.” “But they actually got married not far from here in Edinburgh, and my grandmother was very keen on jewelry, I believe, and my grandfather, I believe, bought her this because it’s from Edinburgh.”

She told Susan, “I originally assumed it might have been given to her by her family, her father, because she was Australian.”

Susan noticed a little detail on the box the necklace was in and said, “The reason you think it was bought in Edinburgh was because the box says Edinburgh jeweller, but the box doesn’t quite fit the pendant right.”

The guest remarked, “That’s fascinating.”

“So I believe your theory that it was given to her by her father before she left could be correct,” Susan added.

“However, it’s possible that he gave her the opals and they had them turned into a necklace when they arrived in Scotland.” Because opals are naturally found in Australia, this is always a possibility.

“They’re incredible; they’re quite sought after right now, especially this kind of opal, which is known as a black opal,” she remarked.

Susan then proceeded to examine the necklace in further detail, pointing out to the guest all of the varied colors that weave in and out of the stone.

“Do you like opals?” she inquired, to which the visitor responded, “I love opals, but I’m a little apprehensive about wearing that one.”

“What I like about that one is that when you turn to the back, it’s just as beautiful.” “Brinkwire Summary News”.

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