11 siblings have sued a funeral home for £60 million for burying the wrong woman.

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11 siblings have sued a funeral home for £60 million for burying the wrong woman.

When they had a pre-planning meeting 72 hours before the funeral – which is part of the Islamic burial ritual – the 11 children were actually told that the woman in the plot WAS their mother.

After staff allegedly buried the wrong woman, a funeral home is being sued for a staggering £60 million.

Instead of burying 87-year-old Sadie Williams, who died of Covid, alongside her late husband, it was discovered that another woman was buried there by mistake.

Salimah Lee, Ishmael Williams, and their nine siblings are suing Slinger-Hasgill Funeral Home in Amityville, New York, for the heinous mistake, according to the Daily Mail.

Worse, when the 11 children had a pre-planning meeting 72 hours before the funeral – which is part of the Islamic burial ritual – they were told that the woman in the plot was their mother.

However, it was only 24 hours later that it was discovered that the body buried next to Franklin Williams, who died in 2018, was not his wife Sadie.

Salimah Lee told ABC that she knew the body wasn’t her mother’s from the start, but that she was ignored when she questioned it.

“I stood at the top of the steps with Joe Slinger (funeral director) and said, ‘That’s not my mother,’ and he said, ‘Of course it is,’ she explained.

“The first thing I noticed when I got to the coffin was that it wasn’t my mother, and she was wearing a child’s watch.”

The funeral home called her the day after the funeral to apologize.

Lee claims that the home attempted to persuade her to sign paperwork to exhume the body as if she were a single child in order to expedite the process, but she refused.

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This meant that before a second funeral, with the correct body, could be held on September 8, all 11 of the siblings had to sign affidavits.

“It is unconscionable how such egregious actions can take place,” her lawyer Phil Rizzuto said.

“The most upsetting aspect of this case is that the family pointed out the mistake, and Mr.

Slinger-Hasgill was adamant about never making a mistake.”

The 11 siblings are seeking £20 million in damages as well as £40 million in compensation.

The funeral home hasn’t responded to the situation yet.

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